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Video: Spark Therapeutics Gene Therapy Hits Goals in Blindness

October 5, 2015

Albert Maguire of the Perelman School of Medicine talks about testing a gene therapy product to help restore vision.

Article Source: CNBC

Penn Dentists Identify Protein That Prevents Bone Loss

October 1, 2015

George Hajishengallis of the School of Dental Medicine is featured for studying a protein that prevents periodontitis and could eventually help prevent bone loss.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 1, 2015

Penn Vet-Temple Team Characterizes Genetic Mutations Linked to a Form of Blindness

blurb: 
A collaboration between University of Pennsylvania and Temple University scientists has identified two naturally occurring genetic mutations in dogs that result in achromatopsia, a form of blindness.

Achromatopsia is a rare, inherited vision disorder that affects the eye’s cone cells, resulting in problems with daytime vision, clarity and color perception. It often strikes people early in life, and currently there is no cure for the condition.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194September 30, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Study Blocks Inflammatory Bone Loss in Gum Disease

blurb: 
A new study led by University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine researchers demonstrates that a protein called Del-1, can inhibit bone loss associated with periodontitis. They also found the protein curbs the activity of osteoclasts, cells that absorb bone tissue, leading to a mechanistic explanation of how Del-1 can prevent periodontal bone loss.

Periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease, doesn’t just cause soft-tissue inflammation and bleeding. It also destroys the bone that supports the teeth. If it progresses unchecked, it can lead to tooth loss and is even associated with systemic inflammatory conditions like atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. 

How Zombies Might Help Me Lose Weight

September 28, 2015

Mitesh Patel of the Perelman School of Medicine suggests making small changes to daily routine to help improve health habits.

Article Source: Washington Post

Audio: Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Works to Reduce Hot Flashes, Penn Study Finds

September 27, 2015

Jun Mao of the Perelman School of Medicine is featured for studying alternative therapies, including acupuncture, to treat hot flashes.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194September 30, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Study Produces Low-cost Drug in Lettuce

blurb: 
At the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Henry Daniell and colleagues produced an effective, low-cost drug that promotes tolerance to clotting factors, which could be taken by hemophilia patients, using freeze-dried lettuce leaves.

Biopharmaceuticals, or drugs that are based on whole proteins, are expensive to make and require refrigeration to store. Insulin, for example, is unaffordable and inaccessible to most of the global population.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Sean Nealon | sean.nealon@ucr.edu | 951-827-1287
Media Contact:Julie Cohen | julie.cohen@ucsb.edu | 805-893-7220
Media Contact:Joyce Conant | joyce.m.conant2.civ@mail.mil | 410-278-8603October 1, 2015

Penn, University of California and Army Research Lab Show How Brain’s Wiring Leads to Cognitive Control

How does the brain determine which direction to let its thoughts fly? Looking for the mechanisms behind cognitive control of thought, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, University of California and United States Army Research Laboratory have used brain scans to shed new light on this question.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658September 17, 2015

Cancer Doesn't Sleep: The Myc Oncogene Disrupts Circadian Rhythm and Metabolism in Cancer Cells, Finds New Penn Study

Myc is a cancer-causing gene responsible for disrupting the normal 24-hour internal rhythm and metabolic pathways in cancer cells, found a team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Postdoctoral fellow Brian Altman, PhD, and doctoral student Annie Hsieh, MD, both from the lab of senior author Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD, director of the Abramson Cancer Center, study body clock proteins associated with cancer cells.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653September 16, 2015

Penn Team Pinpoints Immune Changes in Blood of Melanoma Patients on PD-1 Drugs That Put Potential Biomarker within Reach

A simple blood test can detect early markers of “reinvigorated” T cells and track immune responses in metastatic melanoma patients after initial treatment with the anti-PD-1 drug pembrolizumab, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania report in new research being presented at the inaugural CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference.