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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604October 20, 2015

National Academy of Medicine Elects Three New Members from Penn

Three professors from the University of Pennsylvania have been elected members to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the nation's highest honors in biomedicine. NAM was originally the Institute of Medicine, which was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues.

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donnegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660October 14, 2015

Penn Researchers: New Neuroimaging Method Better Identifies Epileptic Lesions

Epilepsy affects more than 65 million people worldwide. One-third of these patients have seizures that are not controlled by medications. In addition, one-third have brain lesions, the hallmark of the disease, which cannot be located by conventional imaging methods.

Audio: New Brain Scan Spots Hard-to-see Epilepsy Lesions, Penn Study Finds

October 18, 2015

Kate Davis and Ravinder Reddy of the Perelman School of Medicine are quoted about a new imaging technique in development to treat epilepsy patients.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 19, 2015

Penn: Stressed Dads Affect Offspring Brain Development Through Sperm MicroRNA

blurb: 
University of Pennsylvania researchers have shown at the molecular level how experiencing stress changes a male mouse’s sperm in such a way that it affects his offspring’s response to stress.

More and more, scientists have realized that DNA is not the only way that a parent can pass on traits to their offspring. Events experienced by a parent over a lifetime can also have an impact.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658October 12, 2015

Turncoat Protein Regulates Sensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells to Drug, Providing New Target for Preventing Relapses, Finds Penn Study

A surprising, paradoxical relationship between a tumor suppressor molecule and an oncogene may be the key to explaining and working around how breast cancer tumor cells become desensitized to a common cancer drug, found researchers at the 

Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658October 12, 2015

Penn Team Maps First Comprehensive Profile of Non-Protein-Coding RNAs to Provide Clinicians with New Way to Diagnose Array of Cancers

Growing insights about a significant, yet poorly understood, part of the genome – the “dark matter of DNA” -- have fundamentally changed the way scientists approach the study of diseases.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653October 12, 2015

Penn Medicine Researchers Discover Hidden Brain Pathways Crucial to Communication

Being able to understand speech is essential to our evolution as humans. Hearing lets us perceive the same word even when spoken at different speeds or pitches, and also gives us extra sensitivity to unexpected sounds.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604October 13, 2015

NIH New Innovator Award Goes to Penn Bioengineer for Study of ‘3-D Epigenome’

The National Institutes of Health have named Jennifer Phillips-Cremins, an assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science’s Department of Bioengineering, as a member of its

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 9, 2015

Penn Study Stops Vision Loss in Late-stage Canine X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

blurb: 
Three years ago, a team from the University of Pennsylvania announced that they had cured X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, a blinding retinal disease, in dogs. Now they’ve shown that they can cure the canine disease over the long term, even when the treatment is given after half or more of the affected photoreceptor cells have been destroyed.

Version en français

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Media Contact:Michele Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751October 8, 2015

Penn and BU Study Says Obesity Doesn’t Protect Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

blurb: 
According to new research, when accounting for weight history in addition to weight at the time of survey and when adding in smoking as a factor, obesity is harmful, not helpful, to someone with cardiovascular disease.

Demographers Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania and Andrew Stokes of Boston University set out to solve a puzzle: Why is it that study after study shows obese or overweight people with cardiovascular disease outliving their normal