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Construction with Quadrotors

Robots already build cars, sort mail and clean homes, but when you add four helicopter rotors to one, things start getting really interesting.

Using unmanned aerial vehicles called quadrotors, a team of Penn Engineering graduate students has built an autonomous airborne construction crew able to build small towers.

The two mechanical engineering students, Quentin Lindsey and Daniel Mellinger, working with the School of Engineering and Applied Science's Deputy Dean for Education Vijay Kumar, are taking the web by storm with a video of the quadrotors in action.

Video: Gang of Smart Mini-Copters Learns How to Build Stuff

January 17, 2011

The General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is featured for its robotic construction

Article Source: Mashable

Glandt Hitting Stride as UPenn’s SEAS Continues Expansion, Innovation and Leadership

January 11, 2011

Dean Eduardo Glandt of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is featured for his contributions and vision for the school’s future.

Article Source: Flying Kite
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Media Contact:Jacquie Posey | jposey@upenn.edu | 215-898-6460January 7, 2011

University of Pennsylvania Scientists Uncover Inherent Properties of Cell Signaling Pathways

            PHILADELPHIA -- Using an innovative approach based on synthetic biology and mathematical modeling, University of Pennsylvania researchers have explored the workings of a crucial cell-signaling pathway known as the mitogen-activated protein kinase, or MAPK, cascade.

Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

Hearing testimony from a group of diverse experts from the fields of bioethics, theology, law, technology transfer, engineering, and various fields in science and medicine, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues met at Penn on September 13-14.

Penn Science Cafe

Penn Science CafeIf the popularity of the prime-time sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” or the number of television programs produced in the Star Trek franchise (6!) says anything about popular culture, it's that science is not necessarily the enemy of fun. For the skeptics who need proof that science can be dramatic, inspiring and accessible, there is the Penn Science Café, now in its fifth season.

MentorNet Alumna: Being a Woman in Engineering Is “Fun”

December 1, 2010

Katherine Kuchenbecker of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is featured for her academic journey from graduate school to professorship.

Article Source: MentorNet

Haptics Offer the Sensation of Touch Without Touching

January 3, 2011

Katherine Kuchenbecker of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and her haptics Lab students are featured.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Jacquie Posey | jposey@upenn.edu | 215-898-6460December 8, 2010

Penn Haptics Open House: Interactive Exhibition of Hands-On Student Projects Dec. 10

WHO: Katherine J. Kuchenbecker, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania

28 University of Pennsylvania students in Dr. Kuchenbecker’s MEAM 625: Haptic Interfaces graduate-level course on science and technology of touch-based interactions for virtual environments, teleoperation and autonomous robots.  

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658November 29, 2010

Color-Changing “Blast Badge” Detects Exposure to Explosive Shock Waves

PHILADELPHIA - Mimicking the reflective iridescence of a butterfly's wing, investigators at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a color-changing patch that could be worn on soldiers' helmets and uniforms to indicate the strength of exposure to blasts from explosives in the field.