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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 19, 2015

Penn Telescope Minerva-Red Joins Hunt for Earth’s Twin

University of Pennsylvania astronomers are celebrating the dedication of a new planet-hunting telescope known as Minerva-Red. Installed at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona, Minerva-Red is part of the Minerva project, an array of low-cost telescopes that are designed to discover planets orbiting stars other than the sun.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 19, 2015

Penn’s Kang Ko Has a Promising Future in Academic Dentistry

blurb: 
Kang Ko never planned to become a typical dentist. Long before he came to the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine to pursue his degree, he fell in love with teaching and research.

By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone

Kang Ko never planned to become a typical dentist. Long before he came to the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine to pursue his degree, he fell in love with teaching and research. 

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 15, 2015

Making Friends of Friends Benefits Hyenas, Penn Biologist Finds

blurb: 
The spotted hyena seems to instinctively know the benefits of bonding with friends of friends, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis and Michigan State University that considers the structural factors affecting the social network of these animals.

Bonding with a friend of a friend is something most humans gravitate toward naturally, or at least Facebook likes to think so every time it suggests friends for you to “friend.”

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 18, 2015

Penn Researchers Show That Mental ‘Map’ and ‘Compass’ Are Two Separate Systems

If you have a map, you can know where you are without knowing which way you are facing. If you have a compass, you can know which way you're facing without knowing where you are. Animals from ants to mice to humans use both kinds of information to reorient themselves in familiar places, but how they determine this information from environmental cues is not well understood.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 14, 2015

Penn Researchers Join Two NSF Projects on Medical Cyber-physical Systems

The University of Pennsylvania is participating in two National Science Foundation projects designed to advance cyber­physical systems with medical applications. Cyber­physical systems are built from and depend upon the seamless integration of computation and physical components.

Newly Discovered Raptor Species Could Easily Sniff Out Prey, Penn Scientist Finds

May 12, 2015

Doctoral candidate Steven Jasinski of the School of Arts & Sciences is quoted for helping identify a new species of dinosaur.

The Velociraptor Has a Cousin and It’s Even More Formidable

May 12, 2015

Doctoral candidate Steven Jasinski of the School of Arts & Sciences is quoted about studying a new dinosaur whose keen nose made it a formidable predator.

Article Source: Washington Post
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 11, 2015

New Dinosaur’s Keen Nose Made it a Formidable Predator, Penn Study Finds

A researcher from the University of Pennsylvania has identified a species of dinosaur closely related to Velociraptor, the group of creatures made infamous by the movie "Jurassic Park.” The newly named species likely possessed a keen sense of smell that would have made it a formidable predator.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 14, 2015

Penn Researchers Develop Liquid-crystal-based Compound Lenses That Work Like Insect Eyes

blurb: 
Taking advantage of the geometry in which these liquid crystals like to arrange themselves, Penn researchers are able to grow compound lenses with controllable sizes.

The compound eyes found in insects and some sea creatures are marvels of evolution. There, thousands of lenses work together to provide sophisticated information without the need for a sophisticated brain. Human artifice can only begin to approximate these naturally self-assembled structures, and, even then, they require painstaking manufacturing techniques.

Audio/Video: Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em…Cockroach Style?

May 7, 2015

Undergraduates Steve RybickiAriana SchanzerStephanie Mark Article Source: “Newsworks,” WHYY Radio (Philadelphia)