How Zombies Might Help Me Lose Weight

September 28, 2015

Mitesh Patel of the Perelman School of Medicine suggests making small changes to daily routine to help improve health habits.

Article Source: Washington Post

Audio: Acupuncture, Real or Fake, Works to Reduce Hot Flashes, Penn Study Finds

September 27, 2015

Jun Mao of the Perelman School of Medicine is featured for studying alternative therapies, including acupuncture, to treat hot flashes.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194September 30, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Study Produces Low-cost Drug in Lettuce

blurb: 
At the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Henry Daniell and colleagues produced an effective, low-cost drug that promotes tolerance to clotting factors, which could be taken by hemophilia patients, using freeze-dried lettuce leaves.

Biopharmaceuticals, or drugs that are based on whole proteins, are expensive to make and require refrigeration to store. Insulin, for example, is unaffordable and inaccessible to most of the global population.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Sean Nealon | sean.nealon@ucr.edu | 951-827-1287
Media Contact:Julie Cohen | julie.cohen@ucsb.edu | 805-893-7220
Media Contact:Joyce Conant | joyce.m.conant2.civ@mail.mil | 410-278-8603October 1, 2015

Penn, University of California and Army Research Lab Show How Brain’s Wiring Leads to Cognitive Control

How does the brain determine which direction to let its thoughts fly? Looking for the mechanisms behind cognitive control of thought, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, University of California and United States Army Research Laboratory have used brain scans to shed new light on this question.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658September 17, 2015

Cancer Doesn't Sleep: The Myc Oncogene Disrupts Circadian Rhythm and Metabolism in Cancer Cells, Finds New Penn Study

Myc is a cancer-causing gene responsible for disrupting the normal 24-hour internal rhythm and metabolic pathways in cancer cells, found a team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Postdoctoral fellow Brian Altman, PhD, and doctoral student Annie Hsieh, MD, both from the lab of senior author Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD, director of the Abramson Cancer Center, study body clock proteins associated with cancer cells.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653September 16, 2015

Penn Team Pinpoints Immune Changes in Blood of Melanoma Patients on PD-1 Drugs That Put Potential Biomarker within Reach

A simple blood test can detect early markers of “reinvigorated” T cells and track immune responses in metastatic melanoma patients after initial treatment with the anti-PD-1 drug pembrolizumab, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania report in new research being presented at the inaugural CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653September 16, 2015

Multiple Myeloma Patients More Vulnerable to 'Financial Toxicity' Due to Expensive, Longer Courses of Treatments, Penn Study Finds

Even patients with health insurance who have multiple myeloma may be vulnerable to “financial toxicity” – including those who make over $100,000 a year – because of the higher use of novel therapeutics and extended duration of myeloma treatment, researchers from 

Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658September 15, 2015

Penn Study Demonstrates Genes' Major Role in Skin and Organ Development

Knocking out one or both crucial regulatory genes caused cleft lip, skin barrier defects, and a host of other developmental problems in mice, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, hinting that abnormalities in these molecular pathways could underlie many birth defects that are presently not well understood.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 28, 2015

Penn Engineers Design Color-Changing Material That Could Help Diagnose Concussions

The precise link between concussions and debilitating conditions like chronic traumatic encephalopathy is still being explored, but as the name suggests, repeated head injuries are a main culprit. Unfortunately, unlike a broken bone or a torn ligament, concussions are invisible and tricky to diagnose.

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Media Contact:Michele Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751September 28, 2015

Twitter Behavior Can Predict Users’ Income Level, New Penn Research Shows

blurb: 
The words people use on social media can reveal hidden meaning to those who know where to look. New Penn research links the online behavior of more than 5,000 Twitter users to their income bracket.

The words people use on social media can reveal hidden meaning to those who know where to look.