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Media Contact:Katie Delach | Katie.Delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964March 19, 2012

Penn Researchers Find Mentoring Provides Health Benefits for African-American Veterans With Diabetes

Intervention by peer mentors has a statistically significant effect on improving glucose control in African American veterans with diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia VA Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion (CHERP).

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Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369March 19, 2012

New Research From Penn Medicine Reveals Mothers of Kids With Autism Earn Significantly Less

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a lifelong set of developmental disorders that often demand significant resources of time and money from families.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658March 15, 2012

Genetic Variation in Human Gut Viruses Could Be Raw Material for Inner Evolution, Penn Study Finds

A growing body of evidence underscores the importance of human gut bacteria in modulating human health, metabolism, and disease. Yet bacteria are only part of the story. Viruses that infect those bacteria also shape who we are. Frederic D.

Media Contact:Jill DiSanto | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820March 15, 2012

Penn Prof on March Madness: Can Losing Lead to Winning?

PHILADELPHIA -- Is your March Madness bracket filled out yet?  

Imagine you’re watching a close game.  As the teams head to the locker room at half time, only two points separate the two competitors.  Which team do you think is more likely to win?  The team down by one or the team up by one?

If you’re like most people, you said up by one.  But you’d actually be better off going with the team that is losing.  Teams down by one are more likely to win.  And the reason tells us a lot about the effects of competition on motivation.

Penn Museum Helps Put An Irish Murder Mystery To Rest

Fifty-seven Irish workers set sail for the United States in April of 1832 to work at Duffy’s Cut, a Pennsylvania Railroad construction site in Malvern, a city about 20 miles outside of Philadelphia. The workers arrived in Philadelphia in June.

By the end of August, they were all dead.

The railroad company maintained that the workers died of cholera. But William Watson, a history professor at Immaculata University, says he believes they were executed.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194March 14, 2012

Owl Monkey Twins Give Penn's Eduardo Fernandez-Duque Insight Into Monogamy

PHILADELPHIA -- In 15 years of studying owl monkeys in Argentina, this was a first: Late last November, Eduardo Fernandez-Duque, assistant professor in the Anthropology Department at the University of Pennsylvania, got news from his field assistants that they had spotted a set of newborn twins.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658March 13, 2012

Potential Alzheimer's Drug Slows Damage and Symptoms in Animal Model, According to Penn Study

A study published this week in the Journal of Neuroscience shows that the compound epothilone D (EpoD) is effective in preventing further neurological damage and improving cognitive performance in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The results establish how the drug might be used in early-stage AD patients.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194March 12, 2012

Penn Researchers Find Epstein Barr-like Virus Infects and May Cause Cancer in Dogs

PHILADELPHIA -- More than 90 percent of humans have antibodies to the Epstein Barr virus.  Best known for causing mononucleosis, or “the kissing disease,” the virus has also been implicated in more serious conditions, including Hodgkin’s, non-Hodgkin’s and Burkitt’s lymphomas.  Yet little is known about exactly how EBV triggers these diseases.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194March 9, 2012

March 13 Penn Science Café to Explore the Life, Death and Rebirth of the Mississippi River Delta

PHILADELPHIA – At the Penn Science Café on Tuesday, March 13, Douglas Jerolmack, an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science at the University of Pennsylvania, will discuss his research on river patterns and what his findings mean for the future of the Mississippi Delta. 

Plaidoyer pour une journée des hommes

March 8, 2012

Dean Richard Gelles of the School of Social Policy and Practice is cited for co-authoring “Behind Closed Doors.”

Article Source: Agora Vox (France)