Egg Producers Buckle Down as Avian Flu Creeps Toward Pa.

July 6, 2015

Sherrill Davison of the School of Veterinary Medicine is quoted on the impact bird flu can have on the U.S. poultry business.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194 July 1, 2015

Penn Team Identifies Gene Responsible for Some Cases of Male Infertility

blurb: 
Oftentimes men with a type of infertility called azoospermia don’t know the underlying cause of their condition. But new research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that mutations in an X chromosome gene called TEX11 are responsible for a significant number of cases of infertility — an estimated 1 percent of cases of non-obstructive azoospermia.

In the most severe form of male infertility, men do not make any measurable levels of sperm. This condition, called azoospermia, affects approximately 1 percent of the male population and is responsible for about a sixth of cases of male infertility.

First Trimester Stress Linked to Brain Disorders

June 24, 2015

Postdoctoral researcher Eldin Jašarevi of the School of Veterinary Medicine is quoted about studying the effects of stress during pregnancy.

Article Source: FitPregnancy.com

Here’s How to Start Breaking Down the Illegal Wildlife Trade

June 15, 2015

Nikkita Patel of the School of Veterinary Medicine is cited for studying animal trafficking.

Article Source: Washington Post
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 12, 2015

Penn: Mom’s Stress Alters Babies’ Gut and Brain through Vaginal Microbiome

Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother’s vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 12, 2015

Penn Vet Research Confirms a More Accurate Method for Blood Glucose Testing

blurb: 
While glucometers have the advantage of being fast and requiring only a small drop of blood, they are not as accurate as some other methods of measuring blood glucose. In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have found a way of obtaining more accurate measurements from glucometers: by using blood plasma or serum rather than whole blood.

For diabetics, a quick prick of the finger can give information about their blood glucose levels, guiding them in whether to have a snack or inject a dose of insulin. Point-of-care glucose meters, or glucometers, are also used in the veterinary world to monitor cats and dogs with diabetes or pets hospitalized for other reasons.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 1, 2015

Penn Vet Lends Expertise to Improve Colombian Cattle Producers’ Livelihoods

blurb: 
Emphasizing a holistic management approach based on sound nutrition and assisted reproduction strategies, the University of Pennsylvania’s Victor Absalón-Medina's aim is to promote cross-institutional collaborations to help Colombian farmers keep their animals healthy, productive and profitable.

Cattle in the United States are generally managed to either produce milk or to produce beef. However, in most of the world, cattle are counted on to do both in what are called dual-purpose production systems.

Foal-sitting: Exhausting, Exhilarating

May 20, 2015

Jon Palmer of the School of Veterinary Medicine comments on volunteer foal sitters at the new Bolton Center.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Helping Pets, Helping People

A partnership between Penn Vet’s Shelter Animal Medicine program and Pets for Life enhances the education of veterinary students while providing animals in underserved communities with the care they need—but their owners may not be able to afford.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 6, 2015

Penn-Michigan State Team Develops Novel Gene Therapy for Achromatopsia

blurb: 
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Michigan State University tested a gene therapy in dogs with achromatopsia and found that the treatment demonstrated a functional rescue of cone cells in nearly 100 percent of treated eyes.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Michigan State University presented new preclinical data this week that evaluates the efficacy of a gene therapy treatment for achromatopsia, a rare inherited retinal disease that involves cone cells. The disease affects humans as well as dogs.