Brain's Fear Centre Also Influences Kindness: Study

December 15, 2015

Michael Platt of the Wharton School, Perelman School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences discusses how primates respond to a reward-donation task.

Article Source: Business Standard

Trump's Medical Report Is More Insane Than His Campaign Somehow

December 14, 2015

Jonathan Moreno of the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences comments on a report released by Donald Trump’s health-care provider.

Article Source: Daily Beast
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Media Contact:Michele Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751December 14, 2015

Kindness, Charitable Behavior Influenced by Amygdala, Penn Research Reveals

blurb: 
University of Pennsylvania PIK professor Michael Platt discovered that the amygdala, a small structure in the brain, is associated with charitable giving and positive social behavior, not just fear.

The amygdala, a small structure at the front end of the brain’s temporal lobe, has long been associated with negative behaviors generally, and specifically with fear. But new research from Michael Platt, the James S.

Penn Study: Aspirin May Help Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer

December 13, 2015

Despina Kontos of the Perelman School of Medicine is quoted as one of the co-authors of a study that revealed breast tissue density might be lower for women who use aspirin.

Article Source: PhillyVoice.com
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Media Contact:Jeanne Leong | jleong@upenn.edu | 215-573-8151January 5, 2016

Penn Resource Offers Insight Into American Language, Slang and Culture

When Shiho Nagai began attending the informal, not-for-credit slanguage sessions at the University of Pennsylvania’s Christian Association, she had in mind improving her English skills.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653December 7, 2015

Testosterone-Lowering Therapy for Prostate Cancer May Increase Alzheimer's Risk

Men taking androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer were almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the years that followed than those who didn’t undergo the therapy, an analysis of medical records from two large hospital systems by Penn Medicine and Stanford University researchers

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 8, 2015

Medical Student Presence Does Not Slow Care in Emergency Departments, Penn Medicine Study Finds

Medical students in Emergency Departments often perform an initial evaluation of stable patients prior to supervising residents or attending physicians, who meanwhile provide care to other patients.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 8, 2015

Counseling Paired With Comprehensive Genetic Cancer Screening May Increase Knowledge and Decrease Anxiety Among At-Risk Patients, Penn Study Finds

Many BRCA 1/2-negative patients choose to proceed with comprehensive testing for genetic mutations that increase cancer risk, and when presented with counseling before and after testing, most make informed decisions and experience decreased levels of anxiety, according to new research from the 

Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 8, 2015

One-Two Punch of Palbociclib and Paclitaxel Shows Promise Against Advanced Breast Cancer in Penn Study

Combining the new breast cancer drug palbociclib with paclitaxel (Taxol) shrank tumors in nearly half of patient with estrogen-receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 8, 2015

Aspirin Use Does Not Improve Outcomes for Cancer Patients, but May Lower Breast Tissue Density, Allowing for Earlier Detection, Two Penn Studies Find

Whether aspirin may help prevent or reduce the risk of breast cancer remains a hotly debated research question. While past studies have indicated a potential benefit, most recently in hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, one new study from Penn Medicine suggests otherwise.