Ants Can Change Their Roles, Study Finds

December 31, 2015

Shelley Berger of the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences discusses her research on the DNA of ants.

Article Source: New York Times
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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660December 28, 2015

Penn's Anil K. Rustgi Receives American Cancer Society's Research Professor Award

Anil K. Rustgi, MD, chief of Gastroenterology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, is once again the recipient of a prestigious Research Professor Award from the American Cancer Society (ACS).

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Media Contact:Paul Foster | paul.foster@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183December 30, 2015
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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660December 31, 2015

Penn’s Grossman Receives Special Recognition Award for Dedication to the Disability Community

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Murray Grossman, MD, EdD, a professor of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of Penn’s Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center, recently received the Legal Clinic for the Disabled's Special Recognition Award.

Murray Grossman, MD, EdD, a professor of Neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of Penn’s Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center, recently received the Legal Clinic

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658December 31, 2015

Anti-inflammatory Drug and Gut Bacteria Have a Dynamic Interplay, According to Penn Animal Study

blurb: 
Interaction may contribute to adverse effects and lessened effectiveness of one type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication and other drugs.

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) changed the composition and diversity of gut microbes, which in turn shaped how the drug is broken down and ultimately, cut its effectiveness, according to an animal study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 30, 2015

T Cells That Recognize HER2 Receptor May Be Key to Preventing HER2+ Breast Cancer Recurrence, Penn Study Finds

Recurrence of HER2-positive breast cancer after treatment may be due to a specific and possibly cancer-induced weakness in the patient’s immune system – a weakness that in principle could be corrected with a HER2-targeted vaccine – according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Results of the study show that T cells from patient

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653December 30, 2015

New Breast Cancer Drug May be Effective against Other Types of Cancer, Abramson Cancer Center Experts Find

blurb: 
Palbociclib, in combination with other therapies, has potentially powerful effect.

Palbociclib, a new oral drug whose efficacy in combating breast cancer has been demonstrated alone and in combination with endocrine therapy, also has potential to combat other types of cancer, according to a literature review and additional original research conducted by experts at the

Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658December 31, 2015

Penn-led Team Reprograms Social Behavior in Carpenter Ants Using Epigenetic Drugs

blurb: 
In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team anchored at University of Pennsylvania found that these caste-specific behaviors are not set in stone. Rather, this pioneering study shows that social behavior can be reprogrammed, indicating that an individual’s epigenetic, not genetic, makeup determines behavior in ant colonies.

In Florida carpenter ant colonies, distinct worker castes called minors and majors exhibit pronounced differences in social behavior throughout their lives. In a new study published today in Science, a multi-institution team anchored at University of Pennsylvania found that these caste-specific behaviors are not set in stone.

New Blood Thinner ‘Antidote’ to Help Doctors Move Past Warfarin

December 23, 2015

Mariell Jessup of the Perelman School of Medicine comments on physicians’ use of blood thinners.

Article Source: Reuters

Mustaches Muscle Out Women at Medical Institutions

December 17, 2015

Mackenzie Wehner of the Perelman School of Medicine is quoted for leading a study that shows women are less likely to hold academic medical leadership roles than men with mustaches.

Article Source: Philly.com