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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 15, 2015

Penn Senior Adrian Lievano to Tackle Water Security in Kenya

blurb: 
Building prosthetic limbs and developing rain-water filtration systems may seem like they have nothing in common. But to Adrian Lievano, a University of Pennsylvania senior from Miami majoring in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, there’s a synergy: In both cases, the user is the designer’s top priority.

By Madeleine Stone @themadstone       

(This is the second in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President’s Engagement Prize winners.)  

Phone Flies a Drone With Its Own Internal Camera

April 13, 2015

The robotics lab at the School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed a cell phone drone.

Article Source: Popular Science

New Study Shows How Thinking Less Can Enable Faster Learning

April 13, 2015

Danielle Bassett of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is quoted on her research on graphing brain activity.

Article Source: Forbes

Using Fewer Brain ‘Tools’ May Speed Learning

April 9, 2015

Danielle Bassett of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is quoted on her new analysis methods to network the brain.

Article Source: Epoch Times
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Gina Bryan | bryangm@upenn.edu | 215-898-8721April 9, 2015

Penn Science Café Presents ‘An Introduction to Kirigami: Cutting, Folding and Building With Triangles’

blurb: 
Randall Kamien, Shu Yang, XingTing Gong, Daniel Sussman, Toen Castle and Michael Tanis, members of a research team from the departments of Physics and Astronomy and Materials Science and Engineering, will present "An Introduction to Kirigami: Cutting, Folding and Building With Triangles."

WHO:            Randall Kamien

                      Shu Yang

                     XingTing Gong

                     Daniel Sussman

Celebrating Inaugural President’s Engagement Prize Recipients

Penn President Amy Gutmann said she vividly remembers the afternoon she called the five recipients of the new President’s Engagement P

Penn Study Finds Faster Learners Don’t Overthink

April 7, 2015

Danielle Bassett of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is highlighted in a front-page story for leading a st

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 6, 2015

Penn, Johns Hopkins and UCSB Research: Differences in Neural Activity Change Learning Rate

blurb: 
A new study suggests that recruiting unnecessary parts of the brain for a given task, akin to over-thinking the problem, plays a critical role in the difference between people who pick up a new skill faster or slower.

Why do some people learn a new skill right away, while others only gradually improve? Whatever else may be different about their lives, something must be happening in their brains that captures this variation.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 3, 2015

Penn Researchers Use ‘Soft’ Nanoparticles to Model Behavior at Interfaces

blurb: 
By engineering nanoparticles that stick to an oil-water interface but not each other, Penn researchers have created a system that acts like a two-dimensional liquid.

Where water and oil meet, a two-dimensional world exists. This interface presents a potentially useful set of properties for chemists and engineers, but getting anything more complex than a soap molecule to stay there and behave predictably remains a challenge.   

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 26, 2015

Swimming Algae Offer Penn Researchers Insights Into Living Fluid Dynamics

blurb: 
Very little is known about the dynamics of so-called “living fluids,” those containing cells, microorganisms or other biological structures. Penn researchers have shown how a model organism's swimming strokes change along with a fluid's elasticity.

 By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone

None of us would be alive if sperm cells didn’t know how to swim, or if the cilia in our lungs couldn’t prevent fluid buildup. But we know very little about the dynamics of so-called “living fluids,” those containing cells, microorganisms or other biological structures.