Robotic Boats to the Rescue

Imagine sailing a container ship to help with cleanup at the site of a massive oil spill. Now imagine if each container were actually an autonomous robotic boat. Dumped into the ocean, the boats could link up to form an ad-hoc platform for landing a helicopter or operating a crane.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_Tb6SCTyy8[/youtube]

Penn Scientists Use Protein Fragments to ‘Fool’ the Immune System and Deliver Cancer Drugs

February 22, 2013

Dennis Discher of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is highlighted for leading a research team in developing a way to deliver cancer drugs.

Article Source: Philly.com

A “Passport” for the Immune System

The body’s innate immune system is its first line of defense against invaders. A disease-causing bacterium or a piece of wood from a splinter are treated the same: Cellular agents of the immune system identify these objects as foreign and try to destroy them.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 21, 2013

Penn Researchers Develop Protein ‘Passport’ That Helps Nanoparticles Get Past Immune System

The body’s immune system exists to identify and destroy foreign objects, whether they are bacteria, viruses, flecks of dirt or splinters. Unfortunately, nanoparticles designed to deliver drugs, and implanted devices like pacemakers or artificial joints, are just as foreign and subject to the same response.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 19, 2013

Penn Researchers Help Show That Blood Plasma Is Thicker Than Water

PHILADELPHIA — For decades, researchers thought that blood plasma behaved like water. But, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania and Saarland University in Germany, plasma is more elastic and viscous than water, and, like ketchup, its flow properties depend on the pressure it is under.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194February 13, 2013

Penn Vet Team Uncovers a Pathway That Stimulates Bone Growth

PHILADELPHIA — Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have discovered that a protein called Jagged-1 stimulates human stem cells to differentiate into bone-producing cells.

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Media Contact:Jill DiSanto | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820February 12, 2013

Penn Glee Club: Still Singing After 151 Years

With its massive popularity among parents and adolescents alike, the Fox Network’s “Glee” certainly has staying power.  But, its longevity is no match for the University of Pennsylvania’s Glee Club

Penn Professor Brings Calculus to the Masses Through Coursera

February 11, 2013

Robert Ghrist of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and the School of Arts and Sciences is featured for teaching an online calculus class.

Article Source: Philly.com

Crystals That Can Switch Configurations

For associate professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering John Crocker, DNA is not just the stuff of genetics, but the makings of the perfect building block.

“The great thing about DNA is that it will only bind to other DNA that has the complementary sequence,” Crocker says. “So engineers have long thought that we could make a whole library of parts, put the appropriate sequences on the outside, then put them in a test tube and they would self-assemble.”

Penn’s Course a Leader in New Online Move

February 7, 2013

The Penn’s course Calculus: Single Variable, taught by Robert Ghrist of the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been recommended for credit by the American Council on Education.

Article Source: Philly.com