Did Mars Once Have Rivers? The Pebbles Say Yes.

October 14, 2015

Douglas Jerolmack of the School of Arts & Sciences says, “Knowing whether pebbles in a river moved 1 kilometer or 100 kilometers [0.6 miles or 62 miles] could tell us how stable water was on the surface of ancient Mars.”

Article Source: Christian Science Monitor

Audio: Russia in Syria and What It Means for the US

October 12, 2015

Mitchell Orenstein of the School of Arts & Sciences talks about why Russia intervened in the Syrian conflict and what that means for America and the region.

Internships in China Attract US Students

September 23, 2015

Undergraduate student Elizabeth Oppong of the School of Arts & Sciences is highlighted for interning in Shenzhen, China.

Article Source: China Daily

The Pitfalls of Using Google Ngram to Study Language

October 12, 2015

Mark Liberman from the Linguistic Data Consortium is quoted on the pitfalls of relying on technology when studying language.

Article Source: Wired

Million Man March, 20 Years On

October 11, 2015

Adolph Reed of the School of Arts & Sciences is quoted about the fundamentally conservative and sexist nature of the Million Man March, 20 years later.

Article Source: New York Times
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 13, 2015

Plant Hormone ‘Switch’ Unravels Chromatin to Form Flowers, Penn Biologists Find

blurb: 
University of Pennsylvania researchers have identified a hormone-mediated “chromatin switch” that directs a plant to form flowers. In the absence of auxin, genes that initiate flower formation are tucked away in tangled chromatin, a tightly packed bundle of DNA. But, in the hormone’s presence, proteins are recruited to unravel chromatin and make the genes responsible for flower formation more accessible.

Because plants cannot pick up and move, they have evolved a plethora of strategies to cope with environmental stresses, whether they bring a harsh spell of drought or a browsing deer.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 13, 2015

Pebbles on Mars Likely Traveled Tens of Miles Down a Riverbed, Penn Study Finds

blurb: 
In a new report led by University of Pennsylvania geophysicists, they estimate that rounded pebbels on Mars traveled roughly 30 miles from their source, providing additional evidence for the idea that Mars once had an extensive river system, conditions that could support life.

While new evidence suggests that Mars may harbor a tiny amount of liquid water, it exists today as a largely cold and arid planet. Three billion years ago, however, the situation may have been much different.

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Media Contact:Michele Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751October 8, 2015

Penn and BU Study Says Obesity Doesn’t Protect Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

blurb: 
According to new research, when accounting for weight history in addition to weight at the time of survey and when adding in smoking as a factor, obesity is harmful, not helpful, to someone with cardiovascular disease.

Demographers Samuel Preston of the University of Pennsylvania and Andrew Stokes of Boston University set out to solve a puzzle: Why is it that study after study shows obese or overweight people with cardiovascular disease outliving their normal

How Scientists Fool Themselves – and How They Can Stop

October 7, 2015

Jonathan Baron of the School of Arts & Sciences and Uri Simonsohn of Arts & Sciences and the Wharton School are quoted.

Article Source: Nature
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Media Contact:Michele Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751October 8, 2015

Penn Researcher Earns Early Career Award for Work on Brain Stimulation

blurb: 
When John Medaglia joined the University of Pennsylvania a year ago as a postdoctoral fellow, he didn’t yet have a precise path. Now it’s a little clearer, thanks to the prestigious NIH Early Independence Award given out to just 16 young scientists across the country.

When John Medaglia joined the University of Pennsylvania a year ago as a postdoctoral fellow, he didn’t yet have a precise path. Now it’s a little clearer, thanks to a prestigious honor given out to just 16 young scientists across the country.