Penn Awards IEA Director Kleinman Center’s Carnot Prize, Creates Fellowship in His Honor

Lindsey Samahon | lindsey@clickclackcontent.com | 484-362-8316
Michele W. Berger | mwberger@upenn.edu | 215-898-6751
Thursday, November 17, 2016

The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Design awarded its second annual Carnot Prize to Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency. Birol received this prize for his distinguished contributions to energy policy a day after the release of IEA’s World Energy Outlook, a leading source of energy market analysis and projections.

Fatih Birol

Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the International Energy Agency and the 2016 Carnot Prize recipient

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​“I am extremely honored by this distinction, which celebrates a forefather of the energy revolution, a mathematician and scientist: Nicolas Sadi Carnot,” Birol said. “Carnot’s work has helped improve our understanding of energy efficiency, a topic to which we are very much attached at the IEA.”

“We honor Fatih Birol for guiding the complex and politically fraught process of global collaboration on energy policy,” said Penn President Amy Gutmann. “Dr. Birol is steadily advancing inclusivity and equity by expanding the IEA’s role beyond primarily ‘first-world’ interests to encompass a much broader global community.”

At the award ceremony, Gutmann announced a new graduate student fellowship program at IEA headquarters in Paris, named in honor of Birol, which will provide new opportunities for a rising generation of Penn-educated leaders.

“It’s a special pleasure to be in the company of Penn students who will be the future leaders of our industry,” Birol said.

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz gave personal remarks praising Birol in a recorded video presentation. In a policy lecture, Birol addressed the audience on his transformative vision of the IEA as a global body leading complex energy transitions, and shared his deep understanding of and commitment to the challenges of inclusion and equity.

“Fatih Birol perfectly embodies the ideals of the Carnot Prize. He is a distinguished scholar who brings insight, enthusiasm and charisma to bear on the enormous challenges facing the global energy and climate systems,” said PennDesign Dean and Paley Professor Frederick Steiner.

Mark Alan Hughes

Mark Alan Hughes, director of the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy

​​​​​​​“We could not be more honored to induct Dr. Birol into the Kleinman Center’s cadre of Carnot Prize recipients. His leadership at the IEA is proving critical to the future of the energy sector,” said Faculty Director and Professor Mark Alan Hughes.

In addition to the award ceremony, Birol also directed a morning briefing session at the Kleinman Center with students, faculty and journalists, sharing highlights and insights from this year’s World Energy Outlook. He was also the featured guest on Knowledge@Wharton, a live, call-in radio show.

Birol announced that his $25,000 in prize money would go toward IEA’s efforts working with the Clean Energy Ministerial, a high-level global forum that works to advance clean energy. Specifically, IEA will help support CEM’s Women in Clean Energy initiative.

Birol is an economist who has been IEA’s executive director since September 1, 2015. He is also the founder and chair of the IEA Energy Business Council, which provides a forum to enhance cooperation between government and industry. He previously served as the chief economist and director of Global Energy Economics at the IEA in Paris.

The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania cultivates energy policy innovation and promotes its application—creating opportunities for students, researchers and professionals to debate viewpoints, explore options and develop agendas for decision and action.

The Carnot Prize is named in memory of French scientist Sadi Carnot, who in 1824 published Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire, which is recognized as the first statement of what is now known as the second law of thermodynamics. Carnot recognized that the power of the steam engine would “produce a great revolution” in human development. The Carnot Prize is intended to honor those leading revolutions in energy policy to further progress and prosperity.