Medicine

Displaying 31 - 40 of 878 articles
Penn Radiology Researcher Awarded $3.9 Million to Help Develop First Three-Dimensional Digital Atlas of Brain Cells
October 23, 2017
James C. Gee, PhD, director of the Penn Image Computing and Science Laboratory in the Department of Radiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received two grants totaling $3.9 million from the National Institutes of Health to help develop a first-ever three-dimensional, cellular-resolution digital atlas of  brain cell types in collaboration with national colleagues from the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and University of California, San Diego.
Penn Study Links Mutations in Notch Gene to Role in B Cell Cancers
October 23, 2017
Notch is one of the most frequently mutated genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in adults in the United States. It is also often mutated in other common B cell tumors, such as mantle cell lymphoma. However, the role of Notch in these cancers has been uncertain. Now, a collaborative effort between investigators at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Harvard Medical School provides new insights into how Notch drives the growth of B-cell cancers. The teams report their findings in Cell Reports.
Moonshot Grant Will Help Researchers See Two of Cancer’s Key Food Sources at Once
October 19, 2017
Imagine trying to take a picture of a runner, but only being able to see her feet. If you could see her whole body, you’d get the full picture of how she uses both legs to put one foot in front of the other to reach top speed. That’s the idea behind a cancer imaging project in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and the researchers just received $1.4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of the Cancer Moonshot to help the effort along.
Penn Study Shows How Female Immune Cells Keep Their Second X Chromosome Shut Off
October 18, 2017
Autoimmune diseases tend to strike women more than men and having multiple X chromosomes could be the main reason why. While a process called X chromosome inactivation serves to balance out gene dosage between males and females, some genes on the “inactive X” chromosome in immune cells can sometimes escape this process, giving women an extra dose of immunity-related gene expression.
Seven Penn Faculty Members Elected to National Academy of Medicine
October 16, 2017
Seven University of Pennsylvania faculty members have been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), one of the nation’s highest honors in biomedicine. They are among 70 new U.S. and 10 international members of the globally renowned organization.
Researchers Discover Which Brain Region Motivates Behavior Change
October 13, 2017
Have you ever been stuck in a rut, going through the same motions day in and day out? How do you motivate to change your behavior? PIK professor Michael Platt and colleagues now better understand how this happens, and it has to do with a region in the brain called the posterior cingulate cortex.
Penn Study: Norovirus Evades Immune System by Hiding Out in Rare Gut Cells
October 12, 2017
Noroviruses are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in the world and are estimated to cause 267 million infections and 20,000 deaths each year. This virus causes severe diarrhea, nausea, and stomach pain.
Penn-led Study Identifies Genes Responsible for Diversity of Human Skin Colors
October 12, 2017
Human populations feature a broad palette of skin tones. But until now, few genes have been shown to contribute to normal variation in skin color, and these had primarily been discovered through studies of European populations.
Amid Devastation of Hurricane Maria, Penn Researchers with Puerto Rico Connections Focus on Helping Colleagues
October 10, 2017
After Hurricane Maria hit, researchers with connections to Puerto Rico, like Arjun Yodh, Alain Plante and Douglas Jerolmak of the School of Arts and Sciences and PIK Professor Michael Platt, reached out to their collaborators on the island.
Penn Team Shows How Seemingly Acute Viral Infections Can Persist
October 6, 2017
Infections caused by viruses, such as respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, measles, parainfluenza and Ebola, are typically considered acute. These viruses cause disease quickly and live within a host for a limited time. But in some cases the effects of the infection, and presence of the virus itself, can persist. RSV, for example, can lead to chronic respiratory problems, measles can lead to encephalitis and the Ebola virus can be transmitted by patients thought to be cured of the disease.